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What are Macronutrients and Micronutrients?

Hi mummy-to-be! When you’re pregnant, your body will demand more nutrients simply because there’s a child growing inside you. Your need for certain macronutrients and micronutrients – like protein, folate and iron – increase by as much as 50%*. However, it can be a challenge to get these nutrients from your everyday diet to meet all your nutritional needs during pregnancy.

Here’s the general rule of thumb: Macronutrients provide our body with energy and they are substances we need in large quantity. Micronutrients are essential nutrients for our body to function healthily and we need them in smaller amounts.

*USDRI

**Note: Probiotics are live bacteria that are good for your digestive system

Why are these nutrients important
for pregnant mummies?

It is important that pregnant mums to consume enough of both macronutrients and micronutrients and these are the reasons why:

  • Production of red blood cells
  • Generating energy
  • For stronger bones and teeth
  • For growth and development
  • For a healthy digestive system
  • Production of red blood cells

    During pregnancy, your body will start to produce higher amounts of red blood cells. These cells help carry oxygen throughout your body and to your little one. To help your body produce enough red blood cells, you will need to consume sufficient amounts of nutrients below.

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    Folate

    Or also known as folic acid, this is a type of B vitamin. This vitamin helps the production of DNA and therefore important in new cell formations. Getting sufficient folate is especially important during pregnancy because it facilitates the rapid cell growth and development of your little one’s spinal cord and brain. It also reduces the risk of neural tube defects; and works closely with vitamin B12 to help make red blood cells. Sources of folate are dark leafy greens such as spinach and mustard greens or avocado and beans.

    Iron

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the production of red blood cells. It helps produce hemoglobin – a type of protein found in red blood cells that helps the blood carry oxygen from the lungs to other parts of your body and to your little one. Foods from animal sources like meat, poultry and fish are rich in iron. Alternatively, beans and dark leafy greens such as spinach are rich in iron as well.

    Vit B12

    Or Cobalamin, works closely with folate to help produce red blood cells and help iron work better in the body. It is also an essential vitamin for maintaining healthy nerves and DNA reproduction. Vitamin B12 is a unique vitamin because it can only be found almost exclusively in foods derived from animals. Try consuming more fish, shellfish, meat, poultry, eggs and milk for more vitamin B12.

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    • Folate

      Or also known as folic acid, this is a type of B vitamin. This vitamin helps the production of DNA and therefore important in new cell formations. Getting sufficient folate is especially important during pregnancy because it facilitates the rapid cell growth and development of your little one’s spinal cord and brain. It also reduces the risk of neural tube defects; and works closely with vitamin B12 to help make red blood cells. Sources of folate are dark leafy greens such as spinach and mustard greens or avocado and beans.

    • Iron

      Iron is an essential nutrient for the production of red blood cells. It helps produce hemoglobin – a type of protein found in red blood cells that helps the blood carry oxygen from the lungs to other parts of your body and to your little one. Foods from animal sources like meat, poultry and fish are rich in iron. Alternatively, beans and dark leafy greens such as spinach are rich in iron as well.

    • Vit B12

      Or Cobalamin, works closely with folate to help produce red blood cells and help iron work better in the body. It is also an essential vitamin for maintaining healthy nerves and DNA reproduction. Vitamin B12 is a unique vitamin because it can only be found almost exclusively in foods derived from animals. Try consuming more fish, shellfish, meat, poultry, eggs and milk for more vitamin B12.

  • Generating energy

    You might feel a little tired when you’re pregnant. That’s because your body is producing more blood, your heart rate is up and you need more energy for your little one’s development. These nutrients will help recharge your body.

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    Fats

    Fat is another source of fuel for your body. Fat also helps maintain your body temperature, your body’s fat-soluble vitamin absorption and your little one’s brain growth. You’ll find it in foods like avocado, salmon and flaxseed.

    Carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are the main source of fuel for you and your little one. There are two types of carbohydrates; simple (e.g. sugars) and complex (e.g. starches). It is recommended that you consume more complex carbohydrates because it doesn’t only give you energy but it also contains micronutrients and fibre that helps with your digestive health. Try brown rice, corn, rolled oats and wholegrain breads.

    Vit Bs

    For your body to produce energy, you will need vitamin Bs to help convert your food intake into fuel. Grains are a great source for thiamine, riboflavin, niacin and folate. Meat has plenty of thiamine, niacin, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12. And you’ll find riboflavin and vitamin B12 in dairy products. Make sure you get enough B vitamins by having a variety of each food group.

    *Note: B vitamins include thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), pyridoxine (B6), folate (B9), cobalamin (B12) and biotin.

    • Fats

      Fat is another source of fuel for your body. Fat also helps maintain your body temperature, your body’s fat-soluble vitamin absorption and your little one’s brain growth. You’ll find it in foods like avocado, salmon and flaxseed.

    • Carbohydrate

      Carbohydrates are the main source of fuel for you and your little one. There are two types of carbohydrates; simple (e.g. sugars) and complex (e.g. starches). It is recommended that you consume more complex carbohydrates because it doesn’t only give you energy but it also contains micronutrients and fibre that helps with your digestive health. Try brown rice, corn, rolled oats and wholegrain breads.

    • Vit Bs

      For your body to produce energy, you will need vitamin Bs to help convert your food intake into fuel. Grains are a great source for thiamine, riboflavin, niacin and folate. Meat has plenty of thiamine, niacin, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12. And you’ll find riboflavin and vitamin B12 in dairy products. Make sure you get enough B vitamins by having a variety of each food group.

      *Note: B vitamins include thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), pyridoxine (B6), folate (B9), cobalamin (B12) and biotin.

  • For stronger bones and teeth

    When you’re pregnant, you may require additional amounts of nutrients to keep your bones and teeth healthy – while you ensure your little one’s bones grow densely. Keep an eye out for these nutrients for a bone-healthy diet.

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    Vitamin D

    Vitamin D helps your body to absorb calcium and phosphorus to form strong bones and teeth. Getting yourself exposed to sunlight daily will kickstart your body to produce its own vitamin D. Try not to apply sunblocks that are SPF8 or higher as it tends to prevent vitamin D production. Other than that, vitamin D is limited to a few food sources. You can find them in egg yolks, fatty fishes like salmons and sardines and Anmum™ Materna.

    Calcium

    Calcium keeps your bones and teeth strong and healthy. When you’re pregnant, your body requires more calcium because your little one needs all the calcium he or she can get to grow. You may also lose bone mass if you have insufficient calcium in your diet. Make sure you consume dairy products, dark leafy greens and add two glasses of Anmum™ Materna daily to meet your body’s calcium requirements.

    Magnesium

    Magnesium is one of the components in the formation of bones and teeth. It also activates enzymes in the body and contributes to energy production. It works closely with calcium to help you regulate normal muscle contraction. Nuts, legumes, whole grains and dark green vegetables are rich in magnesium.

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    • Vitamin D

      Vitamin D helps your body to absorb calcium and phosphorus to form strong bones and teeth. Getting yourself exposed to sunlight daily will kickstart your body to produce its own vitamin D. Try not to apply sunblocks that are SPF8 or higher as it tends to prevent vitamin D production. Other than that, vitamin D is limited to a few food sources. You can find them in egg yolks, fatty fishes like salmons and sardines and Anmum™ Materna.

    • Calcium

      Calcium keeps your bones and teeth strong and healthy. When you’re pregnant, your body requires more calcium because your little one needs all the calcium he or she can get to grow. You may also lose bone mass if you have insufficient calcium in your diet. Make sure you consume dairy products, dark leafy greens and add two glasses of Anmum™ Materna daily to meet your body’s calcium requirements.

    • Magnesium

      Magnesium is one of the components in the formation of bones and teeth. It also activates enzymes in the body and contributes to energy production. It works closely with calcium to help you regulate normal muscle contraction. Nuts, legumes, whole grains and dark green vegetables are rich in magnesium.

  • For growth and development

    Now that you are carrying a little one inside of you, you’re not only consuming for your own body but for the growth of your little one. Make sure you get enough of these nutrients to facilitate his or her development.

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    Zinc

    Zinc supports your overall bodily functions. You and your little one need zinc to support the growth and development of cells. Protein-rich foods are a great source of zinc. You can find it in foods like oysters, poultry, soybeans, mushrooms and squash seeds.

    Vitamin A

    This is a fat-soluble vitamin which promotes good vision and participates in protein synthesis and cells division. It is an essential vitamin for your little one’s growth and development. Try adding vitamin A-rich foods like yellow, red and orange vegetables and fruits such as sweet potatoes, carrots, and pumpkin to you diet.

    DHA

    One of the Omega-3 fatty acids, DHA is essential for the growth and development of your little one’s brain and eyes. Having sufficient DHA in your diet will also improve your little one’s learning ability. You’ll find oily fish such as salmon, mackerel and trout a great source for DHA.

    GA®

    Gangliosides, is one of the key nutrients for brain development and also helps in connecting your little one’s brain cells. You’ll find gangliosides in eggs and Anmum™ Materna.

    Protein

    Protein is made up of amino acids that help build tissues and cells for both you and your little one. It is also an important nutrient in formation of enzymes, hormones and antibodies. Protein is especially important during the second and third trimester. That is when your little one is growing the fastest and you’ll need more protein-rich foods. Try a combination of meat, fish, eggs, legumes and Anmum™ Materna for a good source of protein.

    Folate

    Or also known as folic acid. This is a type of B vitamin that helps with the production of DNA and also the formation of new cells. Getting sufficient folate is especially important during pregnancy because it facilitates the rapid cell growth and development of your little one’s spinal cord and brain. It also reduces the risk of neural tube defects and works closely with vitamin B12 to help make red blood cells and helps iron work properly in the body. You can find it in dark leafy greens, such as spinach and mustard greens, as well as avocado and beans.

    Close
    • Zinc

      Zinc supports your overall bodily functions. You and your little one need zinc to support the growth and development of cells. Protein-rich foods are a great source of zinc. You can find it in foods like oysters, poultry, soybeans, mushrooms and squash seeds.

    • Vitamin A

      This is a fat-soluble vitamin which promotes good vision and participates in protein synthesis and cells division. It is an essential vitamin for your little one’s growth and development. Try adding vitamin A-rich foods like yellow, red and orange vegetables and fruits such as sweet potatoes, carrots, and pumpkin to you diet.

    • DHA

      One of the Omega-3 fatty acids, DHA is essential for the growth and development of your little one’s brain and eyes. Having sufficient DHA in your diet will also improve your little one’s learning ability. You’ll find oily fish such as salmon, mackerel and trout a great source for DHA.

    • GA®

      Gangliosides, is one of the key nutrients for brain development and also helps in connecting your little one’s brain cells. You’ll find gangliosides in eggs and Anmum™ Materna.

    • Protein

      Protein is made up of amino acids that help build tissues and cells for both you and your little one. It is also an important nutrient in formation of enzymes, hormones and antibodies. Protein is especially important during the second and third trimester. That is when your little one is growing the fastest and you’ll need more protein-rich foods. Try a combination of meat, fish, eggs, legumes and Anmum™ Materna for a good source of protein.

    • Folate

      Or also known as folic acid. This is a type of B vitamin that helps with the production of DNA and also the formation of new cells. Getting sufficient folate is especially important during pregnancy because it facilitates the rapid cell growth and development of your little one’s spinal cord and brain. It also reduces the risk of neural tube defects and works closely with vitamin B12 to help make red blood cells and helps iron work properly in the body. You can find it in dark leafy greens, such as spinach and mustard greens, as well as avocado and beans.

  • For a healthy digestive system

    A healthy gut is important during pregnancy because it helps your body with nutrient absorption.

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    Probiotic

    Probiotics are live bacteria which are good for your digestive system. DR10® (bifidobacterium lactis) is one of the examples of probiotics. Probiotics promote a good gut health by preventing the growth of bad bacteria. It also helps in digestion and absorption of certain nutrients. Probiotic can be found in fermented dairy products and formulated milk such as Anmum™ Materna.

    Fibre

    Fibre is an important nutrient for healthy bowel movement. Some fibres such as inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) are prebiotics which serve as food for the good bacteria in your gut. Fibre can be found in banana, asparagus, chicory root, garlic and Anmum™ Materna.

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    • Probiotic

      Probiotics are live bacteria which are good for your digestive system. DR10® (bifidobacterium lactis) is one of the examples of probiotics. Probiotics promote a good gut health by preventing the growth of bad bacteria. It also helps in digestion and absorption of certain nutrients. Probiotic can be found in fermented dairy products and formulated milk such as Anmum™ Materna.

    • Fibre

      Fibre is an important nutrient for healthy bowel movement. Some fibres such as inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) are prebiotics which serve as food for the good bacteria in your gut. Fibre can be found in banana, asparagus, chicory root, garlic and Anmum™ Materna.

Get the important nutrients from Anmum™ Materna

Now that you’ve learned the importance of Macronutrients and Micronutrients during pregnancy, it is important to get them from the right sources. Anmum™ Materna, in low-fat formula, provides important macronutrients and micronutrients you’ll need to support you and developing baby’s needs during pregnancy.